Group activity

    • Gerald Ardito
      Gerald Ardito commented on the blog Excursion 4
      Miranda, I appreciate your thoughtful responses to the questions I raised. I also want to be clear that sometimes, as teachers, you just get a tough group. It's hard to say just what the X factor is, but I have seen it happen. That being...
      • Miranda Barbara
        Miranda Barbara commented on the blog Excursion 4
        Hello Dr. Ardito! I wasn’t really that clear in my post about the behavior. The behavior was occurring in her math class, as well as other classes that I followed them to, specifically in their science class with another teacher. The...
        • Gerald Ardito
          Gerald Ardito commented on the blog Classroom Design
          Well said. I would still ask you to reconsider what might be possible in constructivist teaching methods, especially with middle schoolers.
          • Syed Mohsin
            Syed Mohsin commented on the blog Classroom Design
            Hello Professor, I think that a combination of the two methods (direct and collaboration ) is better than just one method. You never know who will benefit from either of the methods. When it is a totally new concept for the kids, direct...
            • Gerald Ardito
              Gerald Ardito commented on the blog Classroom Design
              Syed, Thanks for your thoughtful response to my comments and questions. This really stuck out for me:  I will try to teach my lessons in this way, and during tests and maybe other things that require more attention, I will teach them...
              • Gerald Ardito
                Gerald Ardito commented on the blog Excursion 4
                Syed, I really enjoyed reading this post for Excursion 4. It also led me to experience a little deja vu. When I was still a 7th grade science teacher, I also used this lab to teach about observations and the scientific method. I was fascinated...
                • Gerald Ardito
                  Gerald Ardito commented on the blog Excursion 4
                  Hannah, I really appreciated your kind and thoughtful responses to Syed's blog post. Thanks.  
                  • Gerald Ardito
                    Gerald Ardito commented on the blog Excursion 4
                    Miranda, You did an outstanding job with this Excursion. Your descriptions are detailed and insightful and your commentary is rich and smart.  I wanted to respond to some of the things that you said: They did not discuss the video...
                    • Gerald Ardito
                      Gerald Ardito commented on the blog Heidi A. Excursion 4
                      Heidi, Thanks for your work on this Excursion. You have done a very solid job describing what you observed in the work of your mentor teacher. You have also highlighted some challenges that teachers face in these days of Common Core testing. I...
                      • Heidi Anthony
                        Heidi Anthony commented on the blog Excursion 4
                        Hi Emma, I can not imagine being in a classroom with no fully structured lesson. I would feel so uneasy. As students it is hard to just sit down and take notes imagine how the middle schoolers feel.    I understand completely why...
                        • Heidi Anthony
                          Heidi Anthony commented on the blog Excursion 4
                          Hi Rachel, This post is very interesting. I have never heard of this strategy but I will definitely be implementing . I think it creates a positive learning environment that promotes interactive learning. I think this allows students to stay on...
                          • Heidi Anthony
                            Heidi Anthony published a blog post Heidi A. Excursion 4
                            Analysis of Learning in Middle School.    I am currently a student teacher (6th grade) and my mentor teacher focuses on ELA. The school is located in the lower east side and it is a district 1 school. For the past few weeks we...
                              • Gerald Ardito
                                Gerald Ardito

                                Heidi,

                                Thanks for your work on this Excursion. You have done a very solid job describing what you observed in the work of your mentor teacher. You have also highlighted some challenges that teachers face in these days of Common Core testing. I wanted to respond in more depth to some things that you have described here.

                                Students will be able to effectively answer multiple choice questions.

                                This is an interesting learning objective for a lesson. It is legitimate to be sure, but it reveals that at least some feel the need (pressure?) to explicitly teach to the test. I was mostly wondering where you were about this focus. Did you consider it necessary/legitimate? Also, what effect do you think the statement about summer school has/had on these students? Was it motivating? De-motivating?Threatening? What do you think?

                                Hook: We have been going over different strategies to help you pass your upcoming state exam. We have been through short responses and extended responses.

                                I am mostly wondering how this idea could have been incorporated into a broader theme about how to read, analyze, and make sense of text, which is a skill that includes multiple choice tests, but exhibits outside of that specific task as well. Do you think that this focus would have been helpful to these students? If so, how might you have orchestrated a lesson to address it?

                                I was surprised about how close their answers came to the correct answer choice. This strategy allowed students to think and actually understand the text. 

                                This is a very interesting phenomenon. Did you see this type of outcome in other collaborative work?

                                I look forward to hearing your further thoughts. To respond to my comments, you can either 1) click on edit and add to your post or 2) "Leave a comment." 

                              • Hannah Treuer
                                Hannah Treuer commented on the blog Excursion 4
                                Rachel,  I love this lesson! I find that every time I implement a i do, we do, you do strategy into my classroom or observed this strategy it is very successful with every age group. The kind of support students feel during this strategy I...
                                • Hannah Treuer
                                  Hannah Treuer commented on the blog Excursion 4
                                  Syed,  Everything about this lesson I love. To even add an artifact from it makes it that much easier to visualize! I specifically love and agree with the massive amounts fo feedback and peer review incorporated into this lesson. It is not...
                                  • Syed Mohsin
                                    Syed Mohsin published a blog post Excursion 4
                                    a. Start by describing the context of the learning. What school district and school? What subject(s)? What was the goal of this/these lessons? I observed a science teacher in a district 30 school, called IS 230. The subject being taught was...
                                      • Hannah Treuer
                                        Hannah Treuer

                                        Syed, 

                                        Everything about this lesson I love. To even add an artifact from it makes it that much easier to visualize! I specifically love and agree with the massive amounts fo feedback and peer review incorporated into this lesson. It is not only vital for teachers to give appropriate and effective feedback, but I think students take their peers feedback very seriously as well. Also, the balance of positive and negative comments is important for anyone to remember. I find it very helpful that whenever I do include negative comments I overly explain it and suggest ways of correcting it or resources students could use to correct it on their own. I would love to think of ways to incorporate more peer review into my social studies classes!

                                        • Gerald Ardito
                                          Gerald Ardito

                                          Hannah,
                                          I really appreciated your kind and thoughtful responses to Syed's blog post.

                                          Thanks.

                                           

                                          • Gerald Ardito
                                            Gerald Ardito

                                            Syed,

                                            I really enjoyed reading this post for Excursion 4. It also led me to experience a little deja vu. When I was still a 7th grade science teacher, I also used this lab to teach about observations and the scientific method.

                                            I was fascinated by what this teacher did in using peer feedback on these lab reports. Typically, I have done myself and have seen teachers use peer feedback to trigger a discussion about the results of the lab, but I do not think I have seen a teacher use this strategy to improve the quality of their writing and written expression. Kudos to them!

                                            It also seems that this teacher was masterful at managing this type of collaborative work. Again, kudos to them.

                                            I have a question for you: what might you have done with this lesson to add both depth and rigor to it (or to the lab itself). Please respond by clicking on "Leave comment" below. I look forward to reading your response to my question.

                                          • Miranda Barbara
                                            Miranda Barbara commented on the blog Excursion 4
                                            Hello Emma, Sorry this comment is a bit late, but I was trying to find another post for Excursion 4, as I just posted mine. I am glad I read this post. I had actually visited Blythedale over the summer when I took ED 675 (students with severe...
                                            • Miranda Barbara
                                              Miranda Barbara commented on the blog Excursion 4
                                              Hey Rachel,  Great post, you were really able to give a lot of detail from your observation! For my observation I was in a 6th grade class, and I observed math lessons. I see a lot of similarities between your teacher and my teacher. I...
                                              • Miranda Barbara
                                                Miranda Barbara published a blog post Excursion 4
                                                Observation of 6th grade math classes
                                                  • Gerald Ardito
                                                    Gerald Ardito

                                                    Miranda,

                                                    You did an outstanding job with this Excursion. Your descriptions are detailed and insightful and your commentary is rich and smart. 

                                                    I wanted to respond to some of the things that you said:

                                                    They did not discuss the video after, so it is unclear what the students got out of the video. I think it might have been a good idea to ask a couple of the students to talk about some ideas after the video.

                                                    In general, it seemed like the goal of this lesson, as it is so often with math, was procedural. How do I....? This focus was then supported by the video and then the individual practice. Now, you are talking about a very experienced teacher, and I respect her work. But I wonder if the behavior issues she described were related to math at all. It is commonly observed that when students are frustrated or struggling, there are often behavioral issues. It makes sense -- if I don't feel confident or competent, my anxiety level goes up and then I do things to alleviate my anxiety. These may not be things that further my understanding and/or ability in math. So, it's possible that the acting up then becomes a coping mechanism.

                                                    So, it looks like the two are separate when they are not.

                                                    i am wondering if it's possible that these students were not actually ready to do the work assigned. And this goes to the comment of yours that I quoted above. They could have been relieved to have watched a video (since they had nothing really to do except watch), but we don't really know if they learned anything.

                                                    I am not saying that I am right about this interpretation. I am eager to know what you think. Is this possible? If so, what actions might you follow to correct the situation?

                                                    And one last question - what would you do to bring these students into the topic that was NOT procedural in nature. How could you make the fundamental concepts of equality real to them?

                                                    I look forward to reading your responses.

                                                     

                                                    • Miranda Barbara
                                                      Miranda Barbara

                                                      Hello Dr. Ardito!

                                                      I wasn’t really that clear in my post about the behavior. The behavior was occurring in her math class, as well as other classes that I followed them to, specifically in their science class with another teacher. The defiant behavior had occurred in the science class when the student was given multiple prompts to respond to a couple of questions and didn’t comply. In the math class I also observed that some of the students were not that engaged in the lesson; like not writing the notes or doing the problems. I do agree that I think these behaviors are most likely coping mechanisms for their lack of understanding with the content, in both math and science. I think that it could also be that the students are not that interested in the material they are learning. The math that they were learning was very procedural, which can be very boring for students. Even the behavior regarding the bullying and name calling could have been a way to steer the class off course so they didn’t have to complete their work. The main teacher that I observed, that taught the math class, told me that a lot of boys don’t have great home lives, and may be currently experiences things at home, so this could be a big factor as well.

                                                      Going forward, to deal with this behavior, I would try to give students pre-assessments for homework a couple of nights before new lessons, and group them up for the new lessons. I think it may be beneficial to group students by ability level and how they did on the pre-assessment of necessary skills. This may help to see as the teacher who the struggling students may be for this lesson and where the attention needs to be focused. I think that also trying to incorporate multi-sensory learning into the lessons could be beneficial to promote engagement. For example, showing the videos, incorporating manipulatives, or even listening to a podcast.

                                                      I think to make this lesson more real to the students I would have them instead work with manipulatives. One thing I could do is put students into group and set up stations with mini seesaws. At each station I could have a problem written and have weights in grams balanced on the seesaw to represent the written problem. For example, if the problem written was x+2=6, I would have six individual grams on the right side of the seesaw, then on the left side I would have two individual grams, and a block that has “x” written on it. In this case I would have to make sure that block “x” weighs 4 grams. The students would have to figure out how much block “x” weighs by adding or subtracting blocks, then show their work for the problem or write what they had to do to keep the seesaw balanced.

                                                      • Gerald Ardito
                                                        Gerald Ardito

                                                        Miranda,

                                                        I appreciate your thoughtful responses to the questions I raised. I also want to be clear that sometimes, as teachers, you just get a tough group. It's hard to say just what the X factor is, but I have seen it happen.

                                                        That being said, I think you have come up with some really interesting, and likely very productive strategies for helping motivate and empower students.

                                                      • Roberto Molina
                                                        Roberto Molina commented on the blog How Middle Schoolers Learn
                                                        In response to your questions:   1. The major lesson I learned from developing and delivering this lesson is that curriculum NEEDS modification.  Even the best written curricula are not one size fits all.  An educator needs to...
                                                        • Roberto Molina
                                                          Roberto Molina commented on the blog The Learning Environment
                                                          Dr. Ardito... I have edited the response.  I believe at this point I have addressed everything requested for the assignment.  Thank you for your feedback.
                                                        ED 524 Spring 2020

                                                        ED 524 Spring 2020

                                                        This is the online home for ED 524 Spring 2020.