C.Raoul Week 11

For me, comprehending a text means that one understands the author’s point of view or context of text. I read a book, sometimes I tend to re-read a page or two over because when I get to another part of the story something didn’t click in my head and I know I didn’t understand something that was written prior which is why I had to go re-read some pages. When I don’t understand what I've read, that is due to the language that the author many have used or certain phrases that is used that I am not accustomed to. This is often what happens to our students. I went to an urban catholic school in Brooklyn, I was thankfully exposed to various literature which helped shape my vocabulary and understanding of different genres. I, however, still had some difficulties understanding where the author was coming from as I didn’t have or was exposed to those same life experiences and these books never really had any thought proving motivation for as I couldn’t relate. I remember doing book report in high school and I got to choose the book I wanted to write about and I decided to compare and contract the ideologies in the book by Toni Morrison the Bluest eyes and The Color Purple by Alice Walker. I had so much passion for these books due to the fact that I could feel the characters. In the journal Texts as Mirrors, Texts as Windows, Janie Scruiba states that, “This is, in part, due to Ladson- Billings ’ s ( 1995 ) call for “culturally relevant pedagogy,” which suggests that students of color will become more invested in education if teachers find ways to make it meaningful to their lives. Within literacy practices, this theory often materializes through discussions about how people of color need to “see themselves” in literature (Cai,2002 ; Gray, 2009 ). While relevance is, indeed, important, it is often reduced to a mirror- like understanding whereby young people of color are expected to find primary—if not exclusive—significance in literature that reflects their racial/ethnic/cultural backgrounds.This statement resonates with me as this is how it is for many minority students due to the fact that there is a lack of representation in books that can lead a student to ask, why am I reading this. This in turn leads to a student becoming disengaged and probably won’t go to class or complete assignment, or participate. Gloria Lasden – Billings, based on research, states in her article that the terms culturally appropriate and culturally congruent, culturally responsive, and culturally compatible have been used to describe the classroom attempts to matching school culture with students’ culture to promote academic success. In my classroom, even though it is a 12:1:4, I try to make adapted books relevant to them and different techniques how I get them engaged in an ELA activity. I work in a school in which the majority is minority students and they are also special needs. I they are in tune to the environment and there is no way I can really engage then by introducing things to them that is not familiar to them especially since they function on systems and familiar routines.

    • Gerald Ardito

      By Gerald Ardito

      Cindy,

      You are clearly engaged in this topic of culturally relevant pedagogy and how it plays out in student reading and writing.

      I was particularly struck by this:

       In my classroom, even though it is a 12:1:4, I try to make adapted books relevant to them and different techniques how I get them engaged in an ELA activity. I work in a school in which the majority is minority students and they are also special needs. I they are in tune to the environment and there is no way I can really engage then by introducing things to them that is not familiar to them especially since they function on systems and familiar routines.

      • Cindy Raoul

        By Cindy Raoul

        Yes my students when out of their element or routines ...throw fits also everything has top be introduced slowly.

      Group B

      Here is the online home for Group B.
      Sub-Group of ED 656 - Fall 2018