Andrew Rohan's week 12

In the new age of literacy and the availability of content available to our students, we must also allow the realization that with the new generation of our students, we are seeing the emergence of a new language. The language of technology and computers. Programming and writing have followed similar historical trajectories as material technologies and explain how they are intertwined in contemporary composition environments. A concept of “computational literacy” helps us to better understand the social, technical and cultural dynamics of programming, but it also enriches our vision of twenty-first century composition (Vee 10). With the popularity and prominence of technology in our society and the growing need to understand and write in computer language (coding), it is now our responsibility as educatiors to incorporate this technology into our classes. Burke says that we need to highlight the fact that perhaps adolescents need to understand algorithmic decision making to intelligently process the digital world (374). Due to the age we are in, coding has shown to be a useful incorporation into the class because of the positive impact it can gave on the students. Coding gives students a creative outlet for critical thinking and collaborative problem solving that will be useful in their future careers. Coding is a way for students to effectively communicate and share information with computers, like instructions would be written differently for a first-grade student as opposed to a twelfth grader, coding is like preparing instructions for a computer to understand (Burke 371). Now with the DOE pushing college and career readiness in our classrooms and in our schools, it goes without question that our students need to learn the basic skills of coding in order to succeed in the modern age. Understanding the computational concepts on which countless digital applications run offers adolescents the opportunity to no longer simply read such media but also become more discerning end users and potentially innovative “writers” of new media themselves (Burke 372). Using the studies by Ardito, he showed in his studay that The goals of the study were to investigate how this technology-rich STEM based curriculum affected the learning of mathematics by these students as well as how the student’s work with robotics fostered their collaborative and problem-solving skills. To a large degree, the method was effective (24-25) . Coding and teaching coding is something that can easily be incorporated into the classroom, however student understanding may be difficult. I had to talk with my students about what cookies are on the internet and how to log into google classroom, so I am already teaching to a disadvantaged group. I think the problem is though the students live in the technological age, they are used to using a technology instead of understanding how that technology works. Because of this, it limits their problem-solving abilities and their critical thinking abilities.

How can you incorporate teaching coding when student struggle with syntax of sentences, since coding languages requires large debugging time?

Does coding allow for easier comprehension of standard literacy content?

Is there a better coding platform instead of Python, like C++or JAVA?

Is there clear steps that lead to better understanding for teaching coding, or is the study still young that researchers and educators are still trying to troubleshoot it.

    • Gerald Ardito
      Gerald Ardito

      Andrew,

      Thanks for your questions. I have posted some responses below:

      How can you incorporate teaching coding when student struggle with syntax of sentences, since coding languages requires large debugging time? DEBUGGING IS A PROBLEM SOLVING SKILL, NOT A LITERACY SKILL. THAT BEING SAID, YOU COULD REFRAME SYNTAX CORRECTION AS DEBUGGING, WHICH MIGHT MAKE A POSITIVE DIFFERENCE.

      Does coding allow for easier comprehension of standard literacy content? GOOD QUESTION. I HAVE FOUND CODING TO BE REALLY USEFUL IN TEACHING PROBLEM SOLVING. THAT BEING SAID, YOU CAN USE CODING TO SUPPORT STUDENTS COMPREHENSION. FOR EXAMPLE, PROFESSOR LYNCH AND I HAVE CREATED A PROJECT CALLED "BARDBOTS" WHICH HAS STUDENTS PROGRAM ROBOTS TO ACT OUT SCENES FROM SHAKESPEARE. THIS TYPE OF PROJECT CAN CERTAINLY SUPPORT HE DEVELOPMENT OF LITERACY.

      Is there a better coding platform instead of Python, like C++or JAVA? I AM NOT SURE WHAT YOU MEAN BY BETTER? CAN YOU CLARIFY?

      Is there clear steps that lead to better understanding for teaching coding, or is the study still young that researchers and educators are still trying to troubleshoot it. THIS IS STILL A PRETTY NEW AREA, ESPECIALLY IN THE AREA OF EMBEDDING CS AND CODING INTO THE CONTENT AREAS. I AM IN THE MIDST OF CREATING A MOOC TO SUPPORT TEACHERS IN DOING THIS WORK.

    Group A

    Here is the online home for you sub group this semester.
    Sub-Group of ED 656 - Fall 2018

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