Andrew Rohan Week 6

Writing takes on many different forms unique to specific content areas. Other subjects may use different methods, but the CCSS wants the classes to be reading diverse literature entries varying from textbooks to primary sources and articles. The first approach is to tach through genres. Using a genre- based approach aligns with extant research that emphasizes the need for all educators to focus on developing adolescent ELs’ academic literacy practices through direct and interactive approaches to teaching reading and writing (Ramos 656). This approach brings in many different avenues for the teacher and students to achieve for the students to grasp what they are writing about and how to understand the material that they are basing their writings on. The meanings themselves bridge those gaps. Experiential meanings convey a text’s content, or what it is about. Interpersonal meanings reveal the author’s judgment of the topic and his/her relationship with the reader. Textual meanings indicate the text’s organization and coherence. (Ramos 657). This process makes sense though, have the students understand the texts content, then have the students make a connection with the author and the work, and lastly visualize how the text itself is organized which allows for students to better structure their writings. Another is the single cycle approach.  Although a single cycle over a lesson does support a clear content storyline, it fails to support teachers in negotiating the direction of inquiry, nature of inquiry, and development of science concepts with students. That is, negotiating with students (as opposed to delivering a lesson to students) requires flexibility and a willingness to manage students’ ideas instead of managing the lesson (Washburn 4). This allows for a multistep approach that can allow the students to make hypotheses and other analyses about a specific topic, research and explore that topic, and then find the correct avenue in which to compose their ideas and feelings. In this cycle there are more stages for student understanding, however there are more stages that a student can get lost. Our school system today is very focused on writing as a product instead of a process. When asked how they prepare students for the high-stakes tests they face, teachers reported heavy emphasis on some familiar types of test preparation, including frequent or very frequent “test prep” on the types of question that appear on the exam, and using sample questions from old exams or commercial practice materials that present similar items (Applebee 18). Students and teachers are forced to favor products because that’s what they are evaluated on. To do that, teachers must look at assessments to ascertain where a student’s level is, throwing the writing process away. The CCSS not only require teachers to integrate the use of informational text has her students doing during but teachers are also required to involve students in speaking and listening activities that are tied closely to comprehension of content (Washburn 9). But to achieve this, you must you content aligned material that may be out of date just to ensure they are ready for the exam. Textbooks are superficial, exceedingly hard to read, badly designed, inaccurate and not designed for the students (Daniels 52-58). In my classroom, it is obvious that students are coming in with writing skills that are lower than where they should be forcing me to have to teach the process of writing to my students again. This requires using texts of varied sources, having them formulate their ideas and teaching them correct writing formats. I think its difficult to do for each specific content, especially science because writing in science class and English class are two different styles. Luckily, I work in a Hochman school that tries to bridge those concepts.

    • Gerald Ardito
      Gerald Ardito

      Andrew,

      You make a really good point here:

      This allows for a multistep approach that can allow the students to make hypotheses and other analyses about a specific topic, research and explore that topic, and then find the correct avenue in which to compose their ideas and feelings. In this cycle there are more stages for student understanding, however there are more stages that a student can get lost. Our school system today is very focused on writing as a product instead of a process. 

      I am wondering how you are trying to split the difference in your classroom.

    Group A

    Here is the online home for you sub group this semester.
    Sub-Group of ED 656 - Fall 2018

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