Week 6 Response

  The models of instruction in context depend on one of the major arguments presented by Applebee and Langer, “Are students writing for length or context?”. This argument is explored further when expressing the idea of textbook content vs. paragraph writing and the pros and cons of classroom textbooks for students and English teachers. Applebee and Langer article express the ire of mandatory books in classrooms. Textbooks are claimed to prepare students for statewide exams, but when a manual only carries proportions of specific texts, just for the student to annotate and express an understanding from a one to seven paragraph except, a lot gets lost in understanding the dominant theme of story or article. Textbooks can produce the response, but they can provide perspective.

  I have a close friend and former colleague who teaches English at a private high school in Brooklyn, New York. He does not have to order textbooks for his classroom, but he must have a curriculum at abides by the state standards. He asks his students on themes they want to address for the given marking period/semester and orders the books based on the subject. This approach furthers Applebee and Langer claim of having students team together to explore a specific text.

  Having students work together to translate a text is a practical approach in adolescent literature. Yancey’s article argues the claim of student writing versus oral presentation and the accusations of discrimination when favoring one responsive format versus the order. Students should be able to both write and orally articulate their literary responses, but it should not reach to the point of where students rely on one active approach versus the other, nor where we form our own biases based on the approaches.

  Daniels and Zimmerman's arguments also don't support the full use of textbooks as it restricts students understanding of full context, especially since some manuals at the high school and college level can lack a form of online extension. When they both reference the Chicago Textbook Experiment, I see the link between textbooks and their results. This claim is debatable depending on who is presenting the arguments, but English textbooks cannot update themselves on an economic (supplementing a schools budget) and cultural level. When considering these arguments in context writing, I must admit when my students write from a book, that they are reading a restricted text. I must also understand that modified versions have their restrictions which will not help my students to understand the full scope of the document they’re given. It is safe to say that book can contain multiple themes and subgenres, which makes them more imperative than textbooks. It is also important to consider when using a book, the modern relevance the book may have to the students and their communities.

    • Gerald Ardito
      Gerald Ardito

      Abdul,

      I found your response to be thorough and thoughtful.

      And I LOVED this:

      I see the link between textbooks and their results. This claim is debatable depending on who is presenting the arguments, but English textbooks cannot update themselves on an economic (supplementing a schools budget) and cultural level.

    Group A

    Here is the online home for you sub group this semester.
    Sub-Group of ED 656 - Fall 2018

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