Week 3 Analysis

When I think of disciplinary-based literacy I think of biological science having its own language. A complex language, and in order for students to learn the discipline they must have opportunities to learn the specialized reading. Science unlike other disciplines cannot be learned quickly and at times the hands-on activities and scaffolding for most middle schoolers is needed. Within the school I work, most students have IEP’s and students have told me that I’m going too fast when I teach. My principal is concerned with covering material and the students are not able to keep up the pace. It is an ICT class in which there is no ICT teacher. The students are frustrated as I am. Some cannot read well, nor write, but I am told to add rigor. The students need time to become familiar with and grow appreciation for the discipline. There also is a need for a science department. Digital Reading adds to the complexity of the literacy landscape after 3rd grade, the last decade has seen an explosion in the range of devices and mechanisms available for interacting with texts. (Digital Trends, 2011; Patel, 2007). Content-area teaching materials and professional development also must change dramatically. As long as curriculums do not include explicit teaching of disciplinary norms for reading. Biancarosa- pg 23-25. It is not radical to suggest that reading, writing, and talk are core practices of science, closely linked to inquiry and the development of scientific knowledge. Cervetti- pg 582. However, as I read this and other articles I found that research in disciplinary literacy has demonstrated how reading and writing differ across disciplines, and how these differences are related to the nature of the disciplinary ways of reasoning and inquiring. Researchers also found that the experts in each discipline approached texts differently and leveraged a different set of reading strategies. Of course. It makes so much sense. In the effort to develop disciplinary literacy, or to teach students to engage with texts of various replaces inquiry experiences in science class, there is broad acknowledgement in the science education community that literacy plays an important role in learning and practicing science. Cervetti- pg 583. In my classroom having the students perform various task keeps them engaged. At times it is necessary to redress certain topics, and as I grow as a teacher I will become accustomed to being adaptable. One of my 7th grade student’s questions everything that I present, and always ask the question HOW. “HOW, do scientist know this? HOW can they prove that?” Then he says, “I don’t believe it.” I always tell student’s science is a phenomenon and anything is possible or impossible. Thus, he’s thinking like a scientist. He wants proof.

Despite the solid evidence base, there are still questions regarding the nature and workings of cognitive strategies. Conley (2008) spotlighted a lack of understanding about how cognitive strategies can be meaningfully integrated. The cognitive approach derives its theoretical support from cognitive psychology, a study of how people perceive, understand, think, reason, remember, and learn. Fang, pg 103-104. With the idea and development of the cognitive approach to learning… administrators need to allow teachers to teach students in the best way fit in the various disciplines. As we all are aware that one size does not fit all. Therefore, adaption must be made. A new way of approaching the skill of teaching, even if that means curtailing the lesson just for that particular period or just for a few minutes to catch one student’s attention who may have steered in a different direction. At present it is required that my students be grouped in three. One Benchmark group, One strategic group, and one Intensive group. Not all the classes have a need for three groups, but I’m required to make these groups and have a self-created work product for each. Totally unrealistic. Each discipline has its own specific vocabulary, text types, and ways of communicating. Hillman- pg 399. The kinds of competencies that are heralded in STEM education, such as teaching students to systematically gather real-world quantitative data for analysis and gaining familiarity with programming languages, do not belong to science or technology, engineering or mathematics. They are human ways of engaging with the world. Tom Liam Lynch, Column Editor, Pg 98

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    • Gerald Ardito
      Gerald Ardito

      Tammy,

      Your response is very thoughtfully done. Thank you.

      I was really struck by this:

      When I think of disciplinary-based literacy I think of biological science having its own language. A complex language, and in order for students to learn the discipline they must have opportunities to learn the specialized reading. Science unlike other disciplines cannot be learned quickly and at times the hands-on activities and scaffolding for most middle schoolers is needed.

      How do you balance your students' needs for meaningful processing time and the requirements of the school schedule and scope and sequence?

    Group E

    http://pacecommons.org/groups/profile/8353/group-d
    Sub-Group of ED 656 - Fall 2018

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