Myself as a learner

I learn in three prominent ways: by visualizing, by discussing and by doing.

The visual component of a lesson is what gets my brain working.  I generally have an easy time following a chart or when a teacher writes the steps of a math problem on the board.  Visual aids introduce the idea that this concept can be broken down and this is how.  They give me confidence in the belief that I can do the task at hand.  However, this belief must be reinforced! 

Discussion is most useful for me when acquiring knowledge on more mental exercises.  In a general education environment, this may mean math and ELA and in a music based environment (As I am used to) this would be music theory.  I am excited by teachers posing open ended questions and debating.  Within the debates, I hear my peers ways of approaching the topics, issues and problems of the lesson.  Usually, theres a moment when I think, wow, thats so practical and would save me some time and why didn't I think of that (Often takes place in a mathematical setting).  This aha moment is where I begin to be able to apply the knowledge I've seen.  

Doing is a the culmination of the visual and verbal aids of a lesson.  Once I have seen how to do something, and, through discussion found the best way for me to do it, I set off on my own.  More often then not, I make mistakes.  This is where I learn my personal pitfalls and preconceived notions within the obtaining of a skill.  At this point I learn what not to do, which ultimately culminates in me figuring out what to do.  

In order to learn, I need an instructor who allows me to make mistakes and helps me consider why these mistakes must be incorrect.  In other words, one who guides me through questions.  Additionally, I benefit from an environment where my peers are supportive of one another and willing to discuss concepts and ideas.  Generally, I learn best during the day in a naturally lit room.  I need one source of noise in order to help concentrate (ie. the speaker).  

I am easily distracted by multiple sources of noise.  If I'm supposed to be listening to a lecture, but there is street noise, a hum in the room, or conversation around me, I am not able to concentrate.  This is true of musical practice as well.  I struggled working in practice rooms during college because I could hear folks all around me practicing various pieces.  My mind wanders with noise (I even struggle listening to music while driving).  Additionally, when a room is dimly lit or there is no natural light, I tend to get sleepy.  Lastly, when an instructor fails to ask questions or allow me and my peers to contribute, I struggle.  I'm often not able to internalize a concept when I'm forced to view it from a single lens (one point of view).  

 

    • Gerald Ardito
      Gerald Ardito

      Joshua,

      Thanks for sharing yourself here (and in your profile) so boldly. Hopefully, you will share some of your music with us at some point.

      This really stuck out for me:

      In order to learn, I need an instructor who allows me to make mistakes and helps me consider why these mistakes must be incorrect.  In other words, one who guides me through questions.  Additionally, I benefit from an environment where my peers are supportive of one another and willing to discuss concepts and ideas.

      I hope you find these things here. And, if not, to point that out.

      • Joshua Weidmann
        Joshua Weidmann

        Hi Professor,

        Thank you for you note and I look forward to working together in an honest and open manner. 

        Sincerely,

        Josh Weidmann

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