Final Reflection

While I certainly spent time trying to process coding, the reality is this course forced me to re-program the computer in my head.  My job is to teach students how to think and process information in-between all the things that life throws at them.  Being a student again, in a class about computer coding, I found the human side of things, which has made me a bit more understanding to the realities of life.

I recently took time to reflect back on what Laura Pappano had written in her article Learning to Think Like a Computer that "it's suddenly not enough to be a fluent user of software interfaces, rather [it is more important] to [u]derstand what lies behind the computer's seeming magic..."  I used this quote in a previous blog post regarding the lack of understanding for many of my students to what lies behind the screen so to speak.  

The truth to all of this is that my level of understanding to what "lies behind the computer's magic" is rudimentary at best, and perhaps my frustrations with some students is rooted in my own inability, up to this point anyway, to be able to contribute a small piece of the road map that will guide these students to deeper understanding of the importance of coding in the classroom.  

So I guess the essential question to answer, as McTighe and Wiggins might request, does the introduction of basic coding into a history class benefit a students over-all understanding of the subject matter?   In my estimation it does.  The introduction of coding allows students the opportunity to claim more ownership of their education.  

Teaching is not an easy job, so any tool that I can use to help guide students is of great value.  Learning code is no different than learning vocabulary; they are both useful in the history classroom. My job is to make sure those things are used correctly as a facilitator of curriculum.  The students and I are variables in a system.  The schooling is my part of the equation; the education is theirs, so they should own it.

 

Good Luck Everyone

    • Gerald Ardito
      Gerald Ardito

      Chris,

      I really enjoyed reading your reflection. As always, it was thoughtful and thorough.

      This particularly resonated with me:

      So I guess the essential question to answer, as McTighe and Wiggins might request, does the introduction of basic coding into a history class benefit a students over-all understanding of the subject matter?   In my estimation it does.  The introduction of coding allows students the opportunity to claim more ownership of their education.  

    Computer Science for Teachers Spring 2017

    Computer Science for Teachers Spring 2017

    The online home for the Spring 2017 CS for Teachers course

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