Excursion1 Excursion 1 This we believe

I found “ This We believe- Keys to Educating Young Adolescents” to be very interesting. Being a childhood educator, we are always told how important the first few years are because it aids the child’s development for the future. After reading this article, I learned about the importance of a successful middle school life for each child because it determines their future educational/professional life. Students are able to question ideas about the world and their functions. Meaning, no are able to have agency in their own learning. They begin to look for answers and take on a position on the specific topic. I am actually witnessing this currently in sixth grade. The students are able to pick a specific topic ( social issues) that interests them to conduct research on in order to create an argumentative essay. I was very surprised about how much they believed in their specific issues and how well they found evidence to back it up.

While looking over some of the questions I saw many people were asking questions in regard to keeping middle schoolers engaged throughout instructions. According to “ This We believe- Keys to Educating Young Adolescents” it is important for the curriculum and pedagogy to be based upon readiness, needs and interest of young adolescents. It is important as teachers to incorporate these key characteristics in the end result of their instructions. This will create a warm welcoming environment for students that promotes engagement and collaboration. If the students are able to relate to the instructions, they are more likely to ask questions and share their opinions. 

 

 

    • Stephanie Schwartzberg
      Stephanie Schwartzberg

      Hi Heidi,

      I found your post to be interesting because it linked to how I would like to help guide students to realize that they are the ones accountable for their education. For early adolescents, I mean this in regards of just being open with their understanding and to feel like they can be their own advocates. Many students that I know in the sixth grade know when they are confused or don't understand something and they just carry on without stopping to ask their question or to clarify with their teacher or peers about their confusion. I enjoyed reading about your students actively taking positions in their discussions and aiming to support their thoughts. I often think that maintaining a student's engagement not only connects to their interests but also in the confidence they have in asking for the help they need to better understand or articulate their ideas. Nice post!

      • Gerald Ardito
        Gerald Ardito

        Heidi,

        You are clearly deeply engaged in some of the core issues we face when working with middle school students. And I agree with Stephanie in finding your post interesting.

        This jumped out at me:

        The students are able to pick a specific topic ( social issues) that interests them to conduct research on in order to create an argumentative essay. I was very surprised about how much they believed in their specific issues and how well they found evidence to back it up.

        I would love to know more about this experience. What did you classroom and teaching look like throughout this project? How did you work with students? Was it whole group instruction and/or were you working with individual students? What actions did you take to support these students' interests and what I imagine where different research and writing proficiencies?

      ED 524 Spring 2020

      ED 524 Spring 2020

      This is the online home for ED 524 Spring 2020.

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