Online Blended Learning Final Four - Physics

This week and last I had to push through to complete the 8 week course within our own time constraints, so I skipped a number of videos that I found to be tedious and/or repetitive. I found that I could click on a section's summary, and glean enough information from the summary to complete the quiz satisfactorily. If I was in the class for credit (or paying for it) I would most likely NOT complete it in this fashion. Having done so, however, shows me the importance of setting up courses with forced completion of each step. As a teacher or faciltator, if I am going to put this much work and time into creating a video based course, I will want my students to watch every second and glean every pearl of wisdom I am imparting.

One format I appreciate from this course is the ability to skip around and re-watch various sections of the videos to reiterate a point I may need reinforcement on. For example, I skipped the videos on momentum and angular velocity/rotational energy because these concepts will not be taught to my seventh graders. However, I focused more on the more introductory topics of velocity, acceleration, and energy because these are exactly what we will be covering in my class. By watching these sections more than once, I have developed a deeper understanding which will transfer to my teaching as early as next week when I begin our physics unit.

I've also developed the idea to create a physics unit that will incorporate some of these explanatory videos for my students. Although many of the videos are far above their level in terms of vocabulary and concept, many exemplify exactly what our mission in our physics unit is: to demonstrate abstract physics concepts through the conceptual lens of play. "Playground Physics" is about applying the laws of physics to everyday activities and observing the laws at work.

Now I plan to add some videos to my google classroom and have the students discuss on the classroom page what they are observing - where the forces are interacting and how. This will hopefully underscore their understanding of Newton's Laws to a more deeper understanding.

    • Anthony Travaglini
      Anthony Travaglini

      Susan, I think it's so great you are using ideas from this assignment to apply to your classes! I also find what you said here very interesting:

      "If I was in the class for credit (or paying for it) I would most likely NOT complete it in this fashion. Having done so, however, shows me the importance of setting up courses with forced completion of each step. As a teacher or faciltator, if I am going to put this much work and time into creating a video based course, I will want my students to watch every second and glean every pearl of wisdom I am imparting."  

        You make a great point, and it's also a reminder that educational content (esp for online) be engaging and not too repetitive. 

      • Kristie Orlando-Bangali
        Kristie Orlando-Bangali

        Susan-

        I agree with you. The ability to skip around and rewatch videos is a huge help that I believe to be true for all learners. This makes me think about how many times I need to watch a YouTube tutorial when learning a new tool, but in "face-to-face" learning, students get "1 take". It would be great to offer more opportunities for them to rewatch, slow down and/or speed up lessons!

        • Gerald Ardito
          Gerald Ardito

          Suzie,

          I want to echo what the others have said about your reflection, especially when you said:

          If I was in the class for credit (or paying for it) I would most likely NOT complete it in this fashion.

          This makes me really think about the kinds of experiences our students typically have, with little choice about content or structure or learning environment or pacing. I wonder, as you well know, about the impact of all of this and what we can do to create more authentic learning experiences and environments.

          Thanks for your ongoing honesty and integrity in this assignment.

           

        Blending Learning Fall 2019

        Blending Learning Fall 2019

        This is the online home for Blending Learning Fall 2019.

        Latest comments