Final Portfolio - Christopher Colella

 

I feel as though my strongest work in EDG 605 was the Storying Data Analysis project- I find data and the stories it tells to be very insightful and took several avenues of data study to examine trends occurring within four schools in the Washington Irving Campus at Union Square. Passages I chose to annotate are posted below:

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I chose using the four schools in Washington Irving to give myself some insight into my own scholastic process and to inquire into my own preconceptions of the students I teach, as well as students in my environment that I do not teach. I found the data set for graduation to be very expansive and thought I could better contextualize the information if I used relevant data for previous students in my school. This also allowed me to make better insights based on my own personal observations and compare my expectations to the 2017-2018 data set.

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I chose to annotate this particular section to highlight the differences in the way schools market themselves to an outside audience. In this section, what surprised me was the disparity between male and female students in three of the four campuses in our school. The distribution of students was not noticeable to me outside of my own school, which has a 78% female population, but the data revealed many different trends that I did not notice in my own experiences. For example, Gramercy Arts is a floor upstairs but has much less students than our school does.

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My expectation prior to coming into this data exploration was that female students would perform better. National data shows that females attend college at higher rates than males and are more likely to receive a degree than their male peers. I was curious if these trends of performance reached out into my own high school in terms of degree attainment and I found that female students slightly eased out male students. Validating my own expectations was a satisfying experience, but it begs the question as to why male students do not perform as well as a population as their female peers. In my own experiences, I tend to think that male students are easier distracted and may have less direction at home from a mother or father figure that can reach them. I also think about how the cultural makeup of my students affects their attitudes towards school. Most of my students are hispanic females; however, because this subgroup makes up the majority of the school, our school has facilities and staff cater to than while other subgroups may fall to the wayside. How can this be extrapolated for our data?

 

One thing that surprised me that I did not cover in the report is how many students are tracked for graduation after six years. A significant amount of students at our schools were not represented by this because we only used four year graduation rates. I wonder what kind of stories could be told by looking through that data in a similar fashion.

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