Mashfiq Ahmed's EDG-605 Week 2 Reading Response

Based on what I know about feedback and assessment, assessment is done in an effort to determine how a student is progressing and how much of the content they understand. Afterwards, a teacher typically provides feedback (either written or verbal). Students will ideally use this feedback to correct and evaluate any misconceptions that they have. Implementing a variety of feedback and assessment in the classroom is a critical component to teaching in order to promote academic success among students. “Feedback thus is a ‘consequence’ of performance” (Hattie & Timperley, 2007). Research tells us that in order for students to benefit from feedback, students must know what good performance is, how their current performance relates to it, and “how to act to close the gap between current performance and good performance” (Dixon & Worrell, 2016). In my classroom, when students are given a task they are provided with success criteria. This is criteria asks as a checklist so students can self-assess whether they understand and have successfully completed everything for an assignment. Alongside the success criteria, they are provided with an exemplar work. This would be an example of good performance with which they can compare their current performance to.

Feedback and assessment can take on a variety of forms depending on the classroom. “The findings indicate that feedback practice is to a certain extent more subject-related than school-dependent. There are different practices in teaching of languages, mathematics, and vocational training…the context of teaching and the nature of the subject affect the way feedback is practiced” (Havnes, 2011). Implementing feedback and assessment can vary from subject to subject. For instance, summative assessments in a physics class might be an exam with multiple choice questions and short answer responses while in an English class it could be a 5 paragraph essay. Additionally, Socratic seminars can be a fantastic formative assessment tool in a U.S. History class but might not be ideal in a math class. With feedback, an English class might focus on grammar and spelling, but these would not be a major point of consideration in a chemistry class. With my English Language Learners who might struggle with scientific terms, it is important for them to recognize that exact spelling is not required to receive full credit on the Regents exam. In this case, the chemistry content itself is more important than the secondary English language content. Although it would be ideal for students to show a mastery of both literacy and science content, in my chemistry class the science content holds stronger importance since that is what they are being tested on at the end of the year.

References

Dixson, D. D., & Worrell, F. C. (2016). Formative and summative assessment in the classroom. Theory into practice55(2), 153-159.

Hattie, J., & Timperley, H. (2007). The power of feedback. Review of educational research77(1), 81-112.

Havnes, A., Smith, K., Dysthe, O., & Ludvigsen, K. (2012). Formative assessment and feedback: Making learning visible. Studies in Educational Evaluation38(1), 21-27.

    • Gerald Ardito
      Gerald Ardito

      Mashfiq,

      I found your reading response to be very revealing about your ideas about and current implementation of assessment in your classroom.

      These quotes from the readings clearly resonated with you:

      “Feedback thus is a ‘consequence’ of performance” (Hattie & Timperley, 2007). Research tells us that in order for students to benefit from feedback, students must know what good performance is, how their current performance relates to it, and “how to act to close the gap between current performance and good performance” (Dixon & Worrell, 2016).

      and

      “The findings indicate that feedback practice is to a certain extent more subject-related than school-dependent. There are different practices in teaching of languages, mathematics, and vocational training…the context of teaching and the nature of the subject affect the way feedback is practiced” (Havnes, 2011).

      However, your discussion about assessment focuses on:

      Based on what I know about feedback and assessment, assessment is done in an effort to determine how a student is progressing and how much of the content they understand. 

      As a former Living Environment teacher, I understand the gravity of the Regents exams and other assessments. However, I find it telling that you do not mention learning in your responses at all. So, I ask you to look at that to investigate your own thinking about that. I am going to hypothesize that you have a passion for Chemistry and that that passion was not inspired by or measured by your performance on tests and quizzes, etc. So, I ask you to consider how you can use feedback to either inspire that passion in your students and/or enhance their (ideally, intrinsic) motivation as learners.

      How does this sound to you? What concerns does it bring up (if any)? What questions do you have?

      and

       

      • Mashfiq Ahmed
        Mashfiq Ahmed

        Hello Professor Ardito, 

        You are correct about my passion for chemistry. I typically do not measure passion through performances on tests or quizzes. In order to use feedback to inspire passion or enhance motivation, it should be provided frequently and should outline how a student is doing as well as encourage their efforts. This can be done in a multitude of ways. Rubrics can be provided for students to evaluate the quality of their own work. Additionally, students can maintain their own records of their self-evaluated work. This would hold them much more accountable. If a student still requires my assistance, it is important that rather than provide the answer, I provide them with different approaches on how to tackle the problem. Feedback needs to be constructive in order for students to stay motivated and create the best work possible. My only major concern with this is how much time can this be dedicated to in the classroom when I am on a time crunch to complete the Regents curriculum? What aspects of the feedback/self-evaluation process can be sent home for the student to complete?

        -Mashfiq Ahmed

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